Faroe Islands day 4: shopping in Tórshavn…and goodbye

Tórshavn harbour
Our last day was not a full day, with our flight leaving from Vagar airport at 2.35 pm. After sleeping in we hit the streets of Tórshavn with one mission: to purchase a real Faroese wool sweater. As we waited for one particular store to open – Guðrun & Guðrun – whose sweaters we had seen through the window each time we went to the grocery store. The trip was a success and Laetitia bought a beautiful cream sweater (which then proceeded to shed all over the car and her coat!)

Statue in The Tórshavn.
The Tórshavn Cathedral.

As we left Tórshavn for the airport we decided to drive to/through the last of the villages we hadn’t been to/driven through on Streymoy: Velbastaður, Syðradalur, and Norðradalur (this place is so tiny it is just a few houses.)

Laetitia in her new sweater with the village of Velbastaður in the background.

A curious sheep in Norðradalur.
And then, just like that, we refueled, drove through the undersea tunnel one last time, dropped off the rental car, and said goodbye!

Read about our first three days here:

Faroe Islands day 3: breathtaking Sørvágsvatn and Gásadalur

Lake Sørvágsvatn

Our main plan for Day 3 was to hike around Lake Sørvágsvatn, located on Vagar just before the airport (you’ll probably fly over the lake when you arrive/leave). From Tórshavn we drove as though we were headed to the airport, through the undersea tunnel and to the town of Miðvágur, where we parked the car in the parking lot of what looked like a hardware store  You can also park a bit closer to the lake if you like: just after the town the road veers right and many people park around there for the hike.

The start of the hike.
The sheep in the Faroe Islands are literally everywhere.

The Sørvágsvatn hike is pretty relaxed (although muddy) but it does get pretty steep at the end; however you’ll be rewarded with incredible views, with the lake looking like a cup of tea above the ocean…

A group of sheep walk with a view of Sørvágsvatn lake behind them.

Lake Sørvágsvatn does actually fall into the ocean, although not from a very tall height.

After Lake Sørvágsvatn we drove as far west as you can go by car on Vagar to Gásadalur to see the waterfall  that falls into the ocean. On the way there the road narrows and you pass through another one lane tunnel. The tunnel was in fact only built in the 2000’s to make the town more accessible.

Gásadalur and the waterfall.

There is a convenient viewing spot located near the waterfall with a little bench you can sit on and enjoy the view. But I also suggest walking down a little further until you hit the ‘no entry’ sign because you can get a better view from there (the photo above was taken in the that spot while the tiny person in the top right is at the official view spot).

Our final stop for the day was Kirkjubøur, back on Streymoy island, just a 20 min drive south past Torshavn.

Ólavskirkja Chruch in Kirkjubøur.

The Visit Faroe Islands website describes the significance of Kirkjubøur better than I can:

 In medieval times, this small village was the cultural and episcopal centre of the Faroe Islands. Today, it effectively consists of three main elements; firstly, the 900 year-old farmhouse/museum Roykstovan, which is thought to be the oldest wooden house still in use today (the Patursson family have lived there for 17 generations); secondly, the present Parish church, Ólavskirkja, built in 1111 and used as the main church in the Faroe Islands for centuries; and thirdly, the medieval Magnus Cathedral, built in the 1300s and the effective seat of power over several centuries.

Inside Roykstovan.
Inside Roykstovan.

On to day 4…