Four days in the Faroe Islands

A group of sheep walk with a view of Sørvágsvatn lake behind them.
Sørvágsvatn lake on Vágar island, Faroe Islands, March 2017.
If you haven’t heard of the Faroe Islands you’re probably not alone. I didn’t know about them until I came across a photo of an incredible landscape online and investigated where it was taken. The Faroe Islands are an archipelago made up of 18 islands in the North Atlantic…and after seeing more photos I became preoccupied with going there. Thankfully I found a friend willing to go on an adventure and from there we set about planning how to get there and how to spend our time. We read a couple of blogs (Near the Lighthouse, Inusualia) and spent a lot of time of the Visit Faroe Islands tourism site (which is fantastic).

All the spots we visited in the Faroe Islands.
We arrived in the Faroe Islands on a Friday evening, and departed in the afternoon on Tuesday. Here’s how we spent our four days:

And if you’re looking for our practical tips and info, you can read them here.

View from outside Tjørnuvík, Streymoy island, Faroe Islands.

Day 1: Rain, rainbows, sheep and a waterfall on the islands of Streymoy and Eysturoy

On our first day, which was rainy and cloudy, we set out from Tórshavn  to visit a couple of villages and towns during the day. Since we knew this would be the worst weather day of our stay we didn’t plan any hikes or outside activities. We first drove to Vestmanna, which was very quiet but had a very nice little harbour…during the summer season you can take a boat trip from here to see the bird cliffs nearby.

Vestmanna
After we left Vestmanna we headed for Tjørnuvík, which is the northern-most village on Streymoy known for its black sand beach. Along the way we saw the Fossá waterfall. There is some confusing information online about the exact location of Fossá but you can’t really miss it. Once you turn off on the road to Tjørnuvík, it is very narrow (single-lane but two-way traffic) and you have drive slowly so you won’t miss the waterfall cascading on your left. The road gets more narrow as you head down a very steep hill to Tjørnuvík but the views are beautiful. It was incredibly windy in Tjørnuvík so we didn’t stay long, but we did get a glimpse of the rainbow from the beach and played fetch with a local dog before we left for Saksun (also on Streymoy).

Fossa waterfall on Streymoy island.
Fossa waterfall on Streymoy island.

View from the beach in Tjørnuvík.
To see the full beauty of Saksun, make sure you drive in further. At first Saksun appears to be nestled in the mountains; however this is just a trick. While it is a located a little higher it is right by a inlet of the ocean on the west side of the island. If you want to walk to the inlet do so from the first part of the village (you turn left from the road) and not from the Chruch side (you keep straight on the road). The little Church in Saksun is very rugged and beautiful and it was one of my highlights from the trip. Near the parking by the Church is the start of some more serious hiking routes, as well as great bathroom facilities.

Saksun village from above…I climbed along the waterfall to capture this view. That’s the inlet from the ocean that you can see.

The Church in Saksun.

The two small rocks you can see in front of the big cliff-face are the witch and the giant (Risin og Kellingin). You can read the legend about these here.
After a energizing few hours in Saksun we left the island of Streymoy for the island of Eysturoy (connected by a bridge) and headed for the town of Gjógv. On the way there we stopped to take some photos of the views and found our car surrounded by sheep. Up until that point all the sheep had run away as soon as I wanted to take a photo – but we soon figured out what was up…it was feeding time and when they saw an SUV pull-up they assumed it was their dinner. 

Faroese sheep on Eysturoy island.
After our photo session with the sheep was over we continued on the way to Gjógv. The drive takes you through some incredible mountainscapes but everything was covered in clouds so we couldn’t get the full experience. However, based on what we read and the route we took I believe we drove close to Slættaratindur, the highest peak in the Faroes.

Gjógv village, our final stop on day 1.

Gjógv

Sheep walk down by the water in Gjógv.
On to Day 2…